To blog but not be a blogger

In a recent article I wrote about why artists should blog and I jumped on the bandwagon and started writing about my work on my fine art website.Then with life and work and all sorts…well I slowed down on the manic postings.

It seems to me that with everything I read about blogging it is an all or nothing scenario. That you must write a post at least 3 times a week and if you do your search engine rankings will increase and will get you all sorts of recognition. And if you don’t be warned the search engines will penalize you for not having fresh new content when you say you will. But what if you’re not that gregarious and still want to share your thoughts and ideas?

Personally I believe put out there as much or as little as you want. I know die-hard bloggers will totally disagree with me but still I think that it is better to say something than nothing at all. The great thing about WordPress is that you can configure it to make it search engine friendly even if you don’t post a lot. Using plugins like Google XML Sitemaps you can tell the search engines to come back once a month and not everyday. There that takes the pressure off, whew.

What I like about the blog format is that it separates the stuff that I want to talk about from my actual portfolio. This keeps my image pages clean and crisp just like an artist wants and what galleries and collectors want to see.  And with WordPress I can have the “blog” hooked into my website which makes it really search engine friendly. It also tells visitors that this it is where they can read more in-depth about my work. I can go when the mood strikes and talk about what is moving me at the moment… or not.

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The real reason artists need to blog

I had a realization as I was reading an article that was sent to me by my latest client. You know sometimes things just need to be said with a certain combination of words and then they hit home. This article was written by Chris Tyrell for Opus Framing and Art Supplies and is called Three Career Concerns. My realization came when reading part one Stories and Value, here is the part that got me…

The point of this exercise is that very often buyers of art (especially those who do not buy art often) want to have something to say about the work they buy because when they put their work on display in their homes or offices they want to have something intelligent to say in response to the compliments it generates. They value being able to respond by saying such things as, “the artist told me that …” or “the inspiration of the work is an interesting story….” Having an insightful anecdote or two to tell admirers of the purchased art provides a lot of the emotional benefit to making the purchase.

by Chris Tyrell

So check it out Kim is now talking about her art and you should too! Oh and did you know that all of Artbiz’s templates are blog ready (just thought I’d throw that plug-in).

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