To blog but not be a blogger

In a recent article I wrote about why artists should blog and I jumped on the bandwagon and started writing about my work on my fine art website.Then with life and work and all sorts…well I slowed down on the manic postings.

It seems to me that with everything I read about blogging it is an all or nothing scenario. That you must write a post at least 3 times a week and if you do your search engine rankings will increase and will get you all sorts of recognition. And if you don’t be warned the search engines will penalize you for not having fresh new content when you say you will. But what if you’re not that gregarious and still want to share your thoughts and ideas?

Personally I believe put out there as much or as little as you want. I know die-hard bloggers will totally disagree with me but still I think that it is better to say something than nothing at all. The great thing about WordPress is that you can configure it to make it search engine friendly even if you don’t post a lot. Using plugins like Google XML Sitemaps you can tell the search engines to come back once a month and not everyday. There that takes the pressure off, whew.

What I like about the blog format is that it separates the stuff that I want to talk about from my actual portfolio. This keeps my image pages clean and crisp just like an artist wants and what galleries and collectors want to see.  And with WordPress I can have the “blog” hooked into my website which makes it really search engine friendly. It also tells visitors that this it is where they can read more in-depth about my work. I can go when the mood strikes and talk about what is moving me at the moment… or not.

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How to use your website as a submission tool

10 tips on How to use your website as a submission tool

  1. Do your research. Find a gallery that fits your work.
  2. Respect and follow the submission guidelines that are posted on the gallery website.
  3. If  submission guidelines are not posted then contact the gallery and ask if they are accepting submissions and if they accept website submissions. The more we as artists ask for our websites to be used as a submission tool the more likely it will happen.
  4. Write a cover letter in the email introducing your self and stating why your work fits with the gallery.
  5. Address your email letter to the appropriate person. If that person is not listed on their website perhaps phone and ask who you should address your submission to. This will show that your are professional and respectful.
  6. Read my post on Writing there are some good resources to help you put together a letter.
  7. Attach at least one image into the body of the email, preferably at the end to encourage the gallery to click-through.
  8. Wait a couple of weeks and send a follow-up email (unless they state specifically not to – don’t call us – we’ll call you) and ask about the status of your submission.  Include your URL which should be part of your signature – read “Shameless Self Promotion for Artists”.  Be respectful and thank them for their time.
  9. If you don’t hear back, well you don’t hear back. Let it go and carry on to the next.
  10. Please have your site up to date. That means your CV, contact info and your images.

What you should not do…

  1. Throw your URL into an email and say “I am submitting my website for review”, click and send.
  2. Address your email letter to “Dear Gallery So and So”.
  3. DO NOT batch email to a number of galleries at the same time.

The procedure for submitting via your website is really no different from what you would do normally. You still need to do your homework, write your words and take your pictures.  Perseverance Furthers!

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